Book review: The Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter + competition

The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter by Cherry Radford was published by Urbane Publications on April 5th and the blog tour for this novel with an Anglo-Spanish flavour was successfully kicked off a few days ago with some great reviews.

Today I am the lucky host of a stop on this tour: sit comfortably, click here to listen to the playlist created by the author (I know, a book with a soundtrack!) and read below...

Synopsis: After the break-up of her marriage, Imogen escapes to her aunt’s converted lighthouse on Beachy Head. Writing for a tedious online magazine but hoping to start a novel, she wants to be alone until she finds an entrancing flamenco CD in her borrowed car and contacts the artist via Twitter. It turns out that actor-musician Santiago needs help with English, and is soon calling her profesora.

Through her window, the other lighthouse winks at her across the sea. The one where her father was a keeper, until he mysteriously drowned there in 1982. Her aunt is sending extracts from his diary, and Imogen is intrigued to learn that, like her and Santi, her father had a penfriend.

Meanwhile, despite their differences – Imogen is surrounded by emotional and geographical barriers, Santi surrounded by family and land-locked Madrid – their friendship develops. So, she reads, did her father’s but shocking revelations cause Imogen to question whether she ever really knew him.

Two stories of communication: the hilarious mistakes, the painful misunderstandings, and the miracle or tragedy of finding someone out there with whom you have an unforeseen, irresistible connection.

How did this book end up in my hands? I was asked if I was interested in reviewing this book and I just had to look at the cover to know that I was. I was then completely sold when I read that the story was partly set along the South coast of England, and more specifically at Beachy Head, which is relatively close to where I live.

Was it a page-turner? Not in a I-can’t-go-to-sleep-if-I-don’t-know-what-happens-next kind of way but enough to make me want to read ‘just one more chapter’ before putting the book down.

Having read the synopsis, did the book meet my expectations? The synopsis is pretty detailed – or at least the one at the back of the proof copy is. Luckily, there was also plenty that wasn’t mentioned so that I could still be surprised when something or other happened in the book. Yes, I’d say that the book did meet my expectations.

Did I like the ending? Very much so, yes. First of all, I liked the choice of narrator, which I am not going to spoil here for you. I also liked the fact that I didn’t really know what to expect as this isn’t your typically predictable romance novel. I had the feeling that – whatever the ending – it would make sense. And it did.

Did the book leave me with unanswered questions? I would have perhaps wanted to know more about the correspondence between Imogen’s father and his mysterious penfriend S. Material for a prequel? I can only hope.

Three words to describe it. Modern. Spontaneous. Family-oriented.

Do I like the cover? Yes, I really like the cover image by David Izkierdo Arispon. Also worthy of mention are the design and typeset of the book. The tiny lighthouses next to the page numbers and the coastal pattern at the beginning and at the end of each chapter are a lovely touch. 
Have I read any other books by the same author? No, this is the first of her books I read.

Will I want to read other books by the same author? I wouldn’t say no to the offer!

Will I be recommending this book? Yes, regardless of location, all the characters are relatable and this novel is about much more than language lessons and Twitter. It’s about loss, new beginnings and family ties to name just a few of the themes.

Anything else? Yes! One lucky reader can win a copy of The Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter by following me on Twitter and retweeting the competition post by 27/05. Comments left here below will count as extra entries (one per person). Good luck!

Thank you for stopping by and do feel free to follow this tour over the next few days:

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